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Found 4 results

  1. A common industrial use case is to select the highest or lowest signal value among several similar measurements. One example is identifying the highest temperature in a reactor or distillation column containing many temperature signals. One of many situations where this is useful is in identifying the current "hot spot" location to analyze catalyst deactivation/performance degradation. When selecting the highest value over time among many signals, Seeq's max() Formula function makes this easy. Likewise, if selecting the lowest value, the min() Formula function can be used. A more challenging use case is to select the 2nd highest, 3rd highest, etc., among a set of signals. There are several approaches to do this using Seeq Formula and there may be caveats with each one. I will demonstrate one approach below. For our example, we will use a set of 4 temperature signals (T100, T200, T300, T400). Viewing the raw temperature data: 1. We first convert each of the raw temperature signals to step interpolated signals, and then resample the signals based on the sample values of a chosen reference signal that has representative, regular data samples (in this case, T100). This makes the later formulas a little simpler overall and provides slightly cleaner results when signal values cross each other. For the T100 step signal Formula: Note that the T200 step signal Formula includes a resample based on using 'T100 Step' as a reference signal: The 'T300 Step' and 'T400 Step' formulas are identical to that for T200 Step, with the raw T signals substituted. 2. We now create the "Highest T Value" signal using the max() function and the step version T signals: 3. To create the '2nd Highest T Value' signal, we use the splice() function to insert 0 values where a given T signal is equal to the 'Highest T Value'. Following this, the max() function can again be used but this time will select the 2nd highest value: 4. The process is repeated to find the '3rd Highest T Value', with a very similar formula, but substituting in values of 0 where a given T signal is >= the '2nd Highest Value': The result is now checked for a time period where there are several transitions of the T signal ordering: 5. The user may also want to create a signal which identifies the highest value temperature signal NAME at any given point in time, for trending, display in tables, etc. We again make use of the splice() function, to insert the corresponding signal name when that signal is equal to the 'Highest T Value': Similarly, the '2nd Highest T Sensor' is created, but using the '2nd Highest T Value': (The '3rd Highest T Sensor' is created similarly.) We now have correctly identified values and sensor names... highest, 2nd highest, 3rd highest: This approach (again, one possible approach of several) can be extended to as many signals as needed, can be adapted for finding low values instead of high values, can be used for additional calculations, etc.
  2. There are various methods to do this. The easiest method is by using the max() or min() functions in the Formula Tool, which are available beginning in Seeq release R21.0.40.05. Here is an example for creating a new signal which is the maximum of 4 other signals: $a.max($b).max($c).max($d) You can also see additional information in this related forum post.
  3. It is often useful to create a scorecard metric that displays a signal name for use in Organzier Topics. This is relatively simple using Formula and the toSignal() function. This Formula creates a string signal that has a value of "Signal Name" for all of time. After I have my string signal, I can use a simple scorecard metric with no statistics to create a scorecard that just displays the value of this string. I have changed the header to only display the end time. Now, I can use this scorecard in an auto-updating Organizer Topic that will always show "Signal Name". This functionality is very useful if you want to create a string signal that has more than one value. For example, say that I have three signals. I want to create a scorecard metric that tells me which of these three signals is the largest at any point in time. I will start by creating conditions for when each signal is larger than the other two. First, I use Deviation Search to find when Signal 1 > Signal 2 and for when Signal 1 > Signal 3. Then I use Composite Condition (logic: intersection), to find when Signal 1 is max. I repeat this process for Signal 2 - Deviation Search to find Signal 2 > Signal 1 and Signal 2 > Signal 3 + composite condition. Finally, I use Formula to find when Signal 3 is max by using union() and inverse() to find when Signal 1 or 2 are not max : $1max.union($2max).inverse(). Now I have 3 conditions which should cover the whole time series, which are true when each Signal is the maximum of the 3 at any point! I'm now ready to create the string signal. Just like I did for a single string, I will essentially be creating new signals with toString(), but this time, I will use splice() to splice in the different strings ("1 is max", "2 is max", or "3 is max") when each condition is present. This works because my "X is max" conditions will never overlap. The result is a string signal that equals whatever signal is the maximum at every point in time! Finally, I'll use Simple Scorecard again to create a metric that displays this Max Signal for use in Organizer Topics.
  4. This question comes up fairly often, so I thought best to put one solution in the forum. Please feel free to suggest other approaches. Say you have two temperature signals and you want a third signal that shows always uses the larger value of the two. The logical thought is an if statement, e.g., in pseudo-code: If temperatureA > tempertureB then temperatureA else temperatureB So the question often hits Seeq support, as "How do you do an IF statement in Seeq". Seeq, at this time, does not have IF statements, but we have some techniques to achieve the same thing. For this particular example, we'll do some signal math, a value search, and then a splice. The if statement is effectively done by the value search. So, here's one approach to solve this problem: Here are the two temperatures plotted, we want to create a 3rd signal that always uses the greater of the two. The next two steps are: Subtract the two temperatures, and do a value search on the results. The value search identifies regions where the blue trace is greater than the green trace. There's one point of caution, and that is the maximum capsule duration. That has to be long enough to capture the periods where the 2nd temperature is less than the first. The last step is use splice to create the 3rd signal. The logic of splice is "use the green signal, except where ever there's a 'B greater than A' capsule, splice in the blue signal". There's an option on splice to blend in the transitions, I did not use that in this example. Here's the splice and the results: Please comment here if you have any questions or have a better way of doing this.
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